Speakers

Jillian Horton
Jillian Horton

Dr. Jillian Horton is an Associate Professor of Internal Medicine at the Health Sciences Centre and the University of Manitoba. She is a graduate of McMaster medical school and completed her residency and fellowship in general internal medicine at the University of Toronto. Dr. Horton has completed a longitudinal internship in teaching Mindful Practice (at the University of Rochester) and Chief Wellness Officer training at Stanford University. She is a sought-after speaker and teacher of mindfulness for clinicians, both nationally and internationally. Her writing about medicine appears regularly in the LA Times, the Globe and Mail, Maclean’s and Medscape, as well as a wide variety of American news outlets by syndication She hosts the novel series Arts, Medicine, Life at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa. In April 2020 she was awarded the Gold Humanism award by the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada for her national contributions to compassion in clinical care and her leadership in the field of humanities in medical education. Her first full-length book, We Are All Perfectly Fine: A Memoir of Love, Medicine and Healing" was released by HarperCollins Canada in February and is a national bestseller. 

Kinnon MacKinnon
Kinnon MacKinnon

Kinnon R. MacKinnon, MSW, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work, York University. Dr. MacKinnon’s program of community-engaged scholarship critically examines gender-affirming care for trans and nonbinary people, exposing the consequences of status quo policy, practice, and medical education to gender minorities in Canada. His interdisciplinary academic writing is available in Social Science & Medicine, the Canadian Urological Association Journal, Education for Primary Care, and Advances in Health Sciences Education, among others. His digital education resource aims to improve clinicians’ knowledge of gender-affirming care and is freely available at www.patient-centred.ca. Prior to joining YorkU, he completed a PhD in Public Health Sciences and postdoctoral training at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. Dr. MacKinnon also held fellowships at the Munk School of Global Affairs (U of T) and in health professions education research at the Wilson Centre (Temerty Faculty of Medicine, U of T).

Maria Mylopoulos
Maria Mylopoulos

Dr. Maria Mylopoulos holds her PhD in human development and education.  She is currently Scientist and Associate Director of the Wilson Centre for Research in Education, Associate Professor in the Department of Paediatrics and Curriculum Scientist in MD Education at the University of Toronto.   Over the last 15 years she has successfully led a program of research aimed at understanding the development and performance of adaptive expertise in medicine, with a particular focus on identifying the ways in which expert clinicians move beyond application of their past knowledge when appropriate to address the needs of patients as well as the limits and opportunities of their own contexts. In her work, Maria uses a range of methodologies and theoretical frameworks from cognitive psychology, clinical reasoning, and the learning sciences to evolve understanding of the knowledge, capabilities and learning experiences that underpin adaptive expertise.  The ultimate goal of her research is to translate this understanding to educational design that promotes the development of expert clinicians who are able to handle the complexities and challenges of the healthcare workplace.

OmiSoore Dryden
OmiSoore Dryden

Dr. OmiSoore H. Dryden, a Black queer femme, is the James R Johnston Chair in Black Canadian Studies, Faculty of Medicine, and Associate Professor, Community Health & Epidemiology at Dalhousie University. Dr. Dryden engages in interdisciplinary scholarship and research that focuses on Black LGBTQI communities, blood donation systems in Canada, systemic/structural issues that affect health and well-being, medical education, and Black health curricular content development.

Dr. Dryden is the Principal Investigator of #GotBlood2Give / #DuSangÀDonner a research project that seeks to identify the barriers Black gay, bisexual, and trans men encounter with donating blood and also analyzes how anti-black homophobia/transphobia shapes the blood system in Canada. Most recently, Dryden is the Principal Investigator on the project Don’t Count Us Out! – a community-informed, culturally sensitive approach to health promotion for African Nova Scotian communities with an initial focus on COVID-19 pandemic. Dryden is a content expert and Associate Scientist with the Maritime Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR) SUPPORT Unit (MSSU). In that capacity, she provides guidance on Canadian Black Health metrics needed to inform the development of health policies and improve the health care system, this specifically focuses on survey data and demographic information, determinants of trust, sexual health and qualitative data collection and analysis.

Dryden has a number of peer-reviewed publications including the co-authored Commentary (with Dr. Onye Nnorom), Time to dismantle systemic anti-Black racism in medicine in Canada” published January 11, 2021, in the CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Dryden is the co-lead of the Black Health Education Collaborative (https://link.edgepilot.com/s/fc920345/H687HQRvmUaFTvF-_M1VPA?u=https://www.bhec.ca/), a member of the Black Feminist Health Science Studies Collective (https://link.edgepilot.com/s/8fc59e83/GoFAq-TLW0ed0SIlnDcpQg?u=https://blackfeministhealth.com/), a board member of the Health Association of African Canadians (https://link.edgepilot.com/s/93e4f303/0hCSBTUF9USJ88HiJFy-YQ?u=http://haac.ca/), and the past co-president of the Black Canadian Studies Association (2019-2021, https://link.edgepilot.com/s/74a4a041/BFKJK_zDekikvErydhI6AA?u=http://www.blackcanadianstudiesassociation.ca/).

Roberta L Bondar
Roberta L Bondar

Roberta L Bondar

Astronaut | Physician | Scientist | Photographer

The first Canadian woman and neurologist to fly in space, Dr. Roberta Bondar is globally recognized for her pioneering contributions to space medicine research, fine art photography, and environment education. She expanded the horizons of millions when she joined the space shuttle Discovery for its 1992 mission, where she conducted experiments for 18 countries in the International Microgravity Laboratory, a precursor to the International Space Station. Her highly motivational talks — punctuated by her stunning photographs — focus on change, social responsibility, and our environment.

For more than a decade after her spaceflight, Dr. Bondar headed an international space medicine research team, finding new connections between astronauts recovering from spaceflight and neurological illnesses on Earth, such as stroke and Parkinson’s disease. Her techniques have been used in clinical studies at the B. I. Deaconess Medical Center, a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School and at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Bondar was also Chancellor of Trent University in Peterborough, Ontario for six years.

Dr. Bondar is a leading speaker and consultant within the medical and scientific communities, and in the field of corporate social responsibility and care for the Earth's environment. She is the co-founder and president of The Roberta Bondar Foundation, a not-for profit charitable organization created to inspire people of all ages to connect with nature through photography. She is also the author of four bestselling books featuring her writing and photography.

Dr. Bondar holds a BSc in Zoology and Agriculture, MSc in Experimental Pathology, PhD in Neurobiology, MD, and is a Board-Certified Neurologist by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. She sub-specialized in Neuro-ophthalmology at Tufts New England Medical Center in Boston and at Toronto Western Hospital.

Among many awards and honours, Dr. Bondar has been recognized with the NASA Space Medal, inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame and the International Women’s Forum Hall of Fame for her pioneering research in space medicine. She has also received 28 Honorary Degrees from universities across Canada and is a Companion of the Order of Canada and a recipient of the Order of Ontario. She is also a Specially Elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, an Honorary Fellow and Honorary Vice-President of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, and has her own star on Canada’s Walk of Fame.

Tasha Wyatt
Tasha Wyatt

Tasha R. Wyatt, PhD is an associate professor and Associate Director at Uniformed Services University's Center for Health Professions Education. As a trained Educational Psychologist, her research interests include issues related to how culture informs teaching and learning, the intersection of race and racism in health professions education, professional identity formation in racially minoritized physicians, and decolonial research methodologies.