2022 White Coat Warm HeART

If you have any follow up questions please send them to Dr. Carol-Ann Courneya.

Dr. Carol Ann Courneya
Director WCWA Exhibit
Email Dr. Carol Ann Couneya
 

Amma By Nisanthini Ravichandiran (Physician)
Amma By Nisanthini Ravichandiran (Physician)

This painting represents motherhood. “Amma” means mother in Tamil. It is dedicated to my own Amma, an incredible woman who has overcome all odds to provide a better life for her three children. She came from a war-torn country with nothing, and she sacrificed everything so that her children could receive opportunities that she never had. Today, she is an incredible grandmother who spreads her love and kindness to every life that she touches.

An Accessory By Sharon Kipfer (Medical Student, UBC)
An Accessory By Sharon Kipfer (Medical Student, UBC)

Alopecia: This piece is part of a creative arts project illustrating dermatological conditions. I aimed to highlight the beauty of a person comes from inside and not the things that adorn the body. The blue halo emanates a calming radiance, and an expression of joy and light-heartedness aims to portray the freedom of acceptance of ourselves by ourselves, and by others.

Anatomical starry night By Amrita Pannu (Physician)
Anatomical starry night By Amrita Pannu (Physician)

This abstract art pays homage to the complexity and the intricate details of human anatomy through a series of overlapped depictions of the various organs, tissues, and cells. The backdrop is formed by the blood circulation which is metaphorically synonymous with the numerous stars in the vastness of the Milky Way galaxy.

Cardiac Teamwork By Michiko Maruyama (Physician)
Cardiac Teamwork By Michiko Maruyama (Physician)

I am very new to medicine and am still learning so much, but I can already see that the heart of being a doctor isn’t just knowledge - it’s also the people we work with and the moments we share with them. I think it’s important to remember that we are going to be more than our brains as doctors, and that we need to keep our hearts open to those around us to truly help them.

Ethereal By Angela Ho (Physician)
Ethereal By Angela Ho (Physician)

This piece originally began as an acrylic pour – layering paints and letting them move. Unsatisfied with results, I pulled the paint across the canvas in a swipe technique. Still unsatisfied, I blackened the majority of the piece. Shadow and light details were added to create the beautiful Mother Earth. Stars appeared, and off we went, floating into space.

Every child matters by Andrew Seal (Physician)
Every child matters by Andrew Seal (Physician)

September 30, Orange Shirt was Canada’s First National Day of Truth and Reconciliation. The findings of the unmarked graves of so many children at the sites of the Indian Residential Schools brought us all together as a country in a state of national grief, shame and remembrance.

Everything By Flora Jung (Resident)
Everything By Flora Jung (Resident)

I enjoy using a range of media to record reflections from my personal life. In this piece, “Everything”, I depict the relationship between the wandering mind and the present at the interface of reality.

First Hope: Nasturtium By Harpreet Lotay (Physician)
First Hope: Nasturtium By Harpreet Lotay (Physician)

For many, hope in the time of Covid took the form of forgotten pastimes, like gardening, that were once the daily rituals of existence. This Nasturtium offered solace. It was the first of my flowers to bloom. A gentle reminder that pleasure and joy can exist in the simplest of things. Hope is the simple act of sowing a seed.

Front Lines By Olivia Ginty (Medical Student, Queens U.)
Front Lines By Olivia Ginty (Medical Student, Queens U.)

Amidst an arduous semester of medical school during the pandemic, the field of medicine has served as both a constant source of exhaustion and inspiration. This line sketch was drawn digitally with the intention of recognizing the responsibility that lies ahead of me, as well as admiring the determination of those on the front lines.

I remember By Marion Maar (University Faculty)
I remember By Marion Maar (University Faculty)

Jisskewinini, Randy Msheekehn Trudeau is resting on the ice field enjoying the warm midday winter sun on the shores of lake Huron in the traditional territory of the Anishinabe People on Manitoulin Island. Hand made traditional mitts, tossed on the ice, unassumingly take on the shape of a heart, inadvertently symbolizing the healing that can be found in this wilderness. Shkagamik Kwe (the earth) invites you to rest in your humanity and take a break from all that is COVID-19.

Implementing indigenous pedagogies By Amrita Pannu (Physician)
Implementing indigenous pedagogies By Amrita Pannu (Physician)

At the core of this painting is the utmost significance of land and land-based learning. The inclusion of indigenous elements in a clinic, consultation with the elders, talking circles, and life-long learning approach-based programs can catalyze the process of indigenization. The four corners of the painting anticlockwise illustrate storytelling, experiential learning, circular rubric, and two eyed seeing pedagogies.

Kaplan Meier Plot By Claire Edmonds (Allied Health Practitioner)
Kaplan Meier Plot By Claire Edmonds (Allied Health Practitioner)

During my research career I spent hours studying survival plots, now I really understand what they mean.

Mentorship By Amrita Pannu (Physician)
Mentorship By Amrita Pannu (Physician)

Each healthcare professional has an evolving journey inspired by the various mentors in their personal and professional lives. I draw a lot of strength from my mother who is an impeccable combination of intelligence, humility, perseverance, and kindness. Educators in healthcare have an opportunity to positively impact the institutional cultures and their mentees through hidden curriculum.

Milk By Sharon Kipfer (Medical Student, UBC)
Milk By Sharon Kipfer (Medical Student, UBC)

Vitiligo: This piece is part of a creative arts project illustrating dermatological conditions. I aimed to highlight a common presentation of this disease in a person where it is most prominent. The yellow surrounding gives a lightness to the relatable subject as he casually fixes his hair. The subject’s comfort in his own skin brings a calmness to this contrasting image.

Mirror Space By Candace Couse (Humanities Scholar)
Mirror Space By Candace Couse (Humanities Scholar)

I am an Interdisciplinary Humanities scholar. I investigate Westernized thought in relationship with death and dying through autobiographical accounts of illness narratives in visual art, interested in what these works do for the artists, viewers and broader understanding of health towards a more humanistic medicine. Mirror Space, uses large-scale embroidery to explore the vulnerabilities of an embodied existence.

Moon Time By Samantha Gibbon (Medical Student, UBC)
Moon Time By Samantha Gibbon (Medical Student, UBC)

This piece explores the role that menstruation, or "moon time" in Indigenous cultures, plays in building families. It explores my experience as a first-time mother, as I decided to grow my family, working in partnership with my moon time.

Mother, Medicine By Samantha Gibbon (Medical Student, UBC)
Mother, Medicine By Samantha Gibbon (Medical Student, UBC)

This piece depicts a newborn about to enter a life-saving open heart surgery. It represents the moment that the mother hands the baby over to the surgical team. Cree syllabics depict the words, "mother" and "medicine", while the open chest shows the heart full of life potential. This opportunity for life would not be possible if it weren't for mother and medicine.

Psychology of Self Doubt By Savita Rani (Resident)
Psychology of Self Doubt By Savita Rani (Resident)

I made this pen & ink drawing while listening to a podcast about the psychology of self-doubt. Interestingly, the final drawing seems to emulate the loops, drops and rises that make up our life-long journey in developing a sense of self. In my professional life, I use art as a means of self-preservation and reflection, as well as for learning and teaching in my medical training.

Rock, lichen, snow, vegetation By Vincent Hanlon (Physician)
Rock, lichen, snow, vegetation By Vincent Hanlon (Physician)

I live on Treaty 7 territory in Alberta, Canada. Territorial acknowledgements are often on my lips and in my ears. These photos and video are another way for me to acknowledge the Blackfoot land under my feet.

Sabe (Wild Man of the Forest) By Randy Trudeau (Allied Health Practitioner)
Sabe (Wild Man of the Forest) By Randy Trudeau (Allied Health Practitioner)

He is “a Spiritual Being of the Medicines and Roots” and in my language I call him a Jisskewinini. His body and the land are one and the same. His heart is Odawa Mnis (aka Manitoulin Island). His mind is comprised of the rocks and deep lakes on Odawa Mnis. Love (gzaagidwin) is the blood that flows through his body, while nurturing his brain. I know him because I am in the wilderness every day, learning the ways of Shkamikwe (the earth) and Sabe in Healing of myself & others.

Shkagamik Kwe G’nandwegonah (Mother Earth Heals Us) By Randy Trudeau (Allied Health Practitioner)
Shkagamik Kwe G’nandwegonah (Mother Earth Heals Us) By Randy Trudeau (Allied Health Practitioner)

All that you see in this picture is related to my way of knowing the healing properties of Shkagamik Kwe (Mother Earth) from an Anishinaabe perspective. The feather, the land, the water, the sun and every brush stroke have meaning. The scene is a reminder to educate students so they may provide good care to Indigenous people one day.

Spirit seeking spirit as Shkagamik Kwe (the earth). Collaborative painting by Randy Trudeau (Allied Health) and Marion Maar (University Faculty)
Spirit seeking spirit as Shkagamik Kwe (the earth) By Marion Maar (University Faculty)

Trees, animals, people and spirits are part of a collective whole of the natural world. All of these Beings collect traumatic events and continuously work on healing their life force. The artists invite you to find the shape that speaks to you, share the meaning that it brings forth for you right now and explore how it connects YOUR story to the collective whole.

Suite Sounds By Andrew Seal (Physician)
Suite Sounds By Andrew Seal (Physician)

On May 15, 2021 Yo Yo Ma playing Bach’s Cello Suite No 1 to all those waiting to receive their vaccinations in Pittsfield Massachusetts after he had received his, was a truly inspiring moment of grace and beauty amidst the anxiety and health concerns felt by so many.

Summer bloom By Jasmine Gill (Medical Student, U of A)
Summer bloom By Jasmine Gill (Medical Student, U of A)

Objects, angles, shadows, lights, colors – all these and many other elements come together to create a photograph, which is what initially drew me to photography. It has been an outlet for creativity and allows me to explore aspects of everyday life that go beyond the regimented nature of professional school.

Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy By Katerina Schwab (Medical Student, UBC)
Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy By Katerina Schwab (Medical Student, UBC)

I learned about Takotsubo cardiomyopathy from a 4th year. This disease is also known as broken heart disease, and can mimic symptoms of a heart attack. It is triggered by stressful events like a loved one passing away. A characteristic finding is that the ventricle swells to the shape of a Japanese octopus trap, for which this disease was named. I wanted to draw in the octopus in the trap, and the rest of the undersea organisms kind of just happened!

The Oldman river valley By Vincent Hanlon (Physician)
The Oldman river valley By Vincent Hanlon (Physician)

I live on Treaty 7 territory in Alberta, Canada. Territorial acknowledgements are often on my lips and in my ears. These photos and video are another way for me to acknowledge the Blackfoot land under my feet.

Three Vessel Cord By Samantha Gibbon (Medical Student, UBC)
Three Vessel Cord By Samantha Gibbon (Medical Student, UBC)

This piece highlights the beauty in the unique functional aspect of fetal circulation. The fetus is snug in the womb, kept alive by the mother that is depicted as an extension of the earth itself. In this image, there is peace; the fetus is completely provided for.

Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada: Calls to action By Amrita Pannu (Physician)
Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada: Calls to action By Amrita Pannu (Physician)

This artwork represents the TRC calls to action numbers twenty-two and twenty-four in the healthcare sector. An indigenous elder is depicted as a guest speaker on an academic day for a group of residents which includes an indigenous representation. The other elements in this painting are the residential schools and their impact on mental health, culturally safe care, and allyship.

War Child By Andrew Seal (Physician)
War Child By Andrew Seal (Physician)

As I painted, over three months, 6 year-old Suzy Eshkuntana being rescued from her bombed out family home in Gaza on May 16, 2021, an attack that took the lives of her mother and four siblings, the painting became an expression for me of the pain, loss and suffering of all children experiencing the iniquities of war everywhere.

Wintry connections: Heart on Ice. Collaborative painting by Randy Trudeau (Allied Health) and Marion Maar (University Faculty)
Wintry connections: Heart on Ice By Marion Maar (University Faculty)

Inspired by our photography on the ice fields we explored the connection between the land and the heart from a two-eyed seeing perspective using acrylics. Cracks in the melting ice fields promise a glimpse of what lies beneath in the dark and cold water; we are reminded that we know so little of what is knowable. Understanding the heart through some of its beautiful arteries gives us a breathtaking but similarly ephemeral understanding of the life force behind its beat.